A few interesting publications

Here are two excellent articles related to Zach Etienne's colloquium




Selected Publications

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By S. D. Bergeson (et al.)
Abstract: We have extended two-photon Doppler-free spectroscopy to the vacuum ultraviolet spectral region, to accurately measure the He 1 S-1-2 S-1 transition at 120 nm. Our result is 4984872315(48) MHz. This yields a ground state Lamb shift of 41104(48) MHz, in fair agreement with theory and other experiments. This approach has the potential for significantly better accuracy once improvements in the laser and the wavelength metrology are implemented.
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By S. D. Bergeson (et al.)
Abstract: New experimental branching fractions and transition probabilities are reported for 56 transitions in Fe II. The branching fractions are measured with a Fourier transform spectrometer and also with a high-resolution grating spectrometer on an optically thin hollow cathode discharge. Highly accurate experimental radiative lifetimes from the recent Literature provide the normalization required to convert our branching fractions into absolute transition probabilities. Results are compared with experimental and theoretical values in the literature. Our new transition probabilities will establish the absolute scale for relative absorption oscillator strengths of vacuum ultraviolet lines measured using a new high-sensitivity absorption experiment at the University of Wisconsin.
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By S. D. Bergeson (et al.)
Abstract: We report the first measurements of UV oscillator strengths (f-values) in Fe II from a high-sensitivity absorption experiment developed at the University of Wisconsin. The accuracy of our measurements is demonstrated by our reproducing well-known f-value ratios in Fe I and Fe II. The first laboratory f-value measurement of the 160.845 nm transition in Fe II is presented and compared to values in the literature. While this paper focuses on Fe II, the high-sensitivity absorption method that we have developed is applicable to essentially every element in the periodic table, for both neutral and singly ionized species, over a broad range of wavelength and line strength.

Theses, Captstones, and Dissertations